Can there be gender equality in the Kenya tourism industry? Eva from AA Kenya believes so.

My names are Evelyn Muronji Walluckano and I’ve worked in the Kenya tourism industry for nine years after I pursued a diploma in food production and a second in tour guiding and administration.

When I enrolled in college the ratio of men to women was 4:1 however the number of women doing tour guiding courses was almost zero. Even today, years later, there are still less than 10 women who actively work as tour guides in Kenya. The reason? Well there is an old perception that tour guiding is a role for men. Many women, even after going through their years in college, end up working in hotels doing bookings for safaris, cleaning rooms, receptionist duties and secretarial roles; they don’t pursue what they studied and instead believe that the afore-mentioned roles are the female jobs in the tourism industry.

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Despite many years of academic analysis and practical feminist activity, despite prestigious international resolutions and declarations of intent, despite increased awareness of women’s issues in the discourses of governmental and non-governmental organizations alike, progress towards gender equality is still painfully slow. Although advances are being made on particular fronts there is still a long way to go.

Looking at the tourist industry in Kenya women are treated as second class to their male counterparts, despite many women having apt skills, knowledge and qualifications and quite often more so than their male counterparts, they are prejudiced and frustrated in terms of remuneration and career growth; organizations would rather hand leadership roles to male employees rather than women. As a result there is no degree or recognition of merit when awarding these posts. Many women are left frustrated and forced to stay in a job only for the meager pay, not because they want to chart a future for career growth within the organization or industry. The contempt shown to women stems from the outdated belief that a woman’s place is in the kitchen and looking after the family whilst the man is the king and has the ultimate say in all aspects of family life.

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Initially I worked for an organization which did not value my education, my skills nor my positive input in terms of business development ideas and plans. My career growth stagnated and I was never nominated for any skills development workshops or courses. My male counterparts were however given every opportunity to better their skills and all leadership roles given to them. Remuneration was also gender biased and all my male counterparts earned more than me. All posts from directors to managers to tour guides were males as the organization believed that men are better, which to me sounded very ridiculous to say the least! I was frustrated by my supervisors and managers who saw me as a threat. I can confidently say that despite this I worked hard and out performed all of my male colleagues; but the organization neither commended nor nominated me for any posts. Frustration grew, but God answered my prayer in the form of a new job at Adventure Alternative.

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At Adventure Alternative I found a different work ethic, something unique and most definitely not the norm in Kenya! It was indeed alternative, it was friendly and the emphasis was on team-work and equality. It was more like a family, everyone was regarded as an individual and not by sex and my career growth is headed on an upward course. My Director Mr. Gavin Bate holds constant briefings and mentors us intensively. He gives each and every one of us an equal shot at becoming their best, he goes an extra mile to follow-up on everyone’s personal development and suggests ways in which we can develop our skills further. Here in this organization we have all come to regard each other as family. We feel that we matter and we feel we grow and develop.

Ever since I joined Adventure Alternative I have worked with men in the field of tour guiding but unlike the past I have experienced equality. If we have the willingness and opportunity to learn from others on an equal basis and mutual respect and if we believe in ourselves, then I believe women can have a bright future in this industry and the sky is the limit.

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How fit do I need to be to climb Kilimanjaro?

This is the most commonly asked question I’ve received in the last fourteen years of organising Adventure Alternative climbs of Kilimanjaro. And the answer – well it depends more on your approach to the climb as a whole, rather than just your fitness.

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A long standing client of Adventure Alternative has done numerous triathlons, marathons, duathlons, ultra marathons and any other thon that you can think of, yet he felt climbing Kilimanjaro was one of his toughest achievements to date! Saying that, another client, who again has been on many different trips with us, found it challenging, tough at times but very achievable and rewarding. And her training? Well she’s a working mum of two who escapes for a few hours at the weekend and once or twice during the week when she’d hit the hills with a light pack, go for a jog or jump in the pool for a few lengths. So it isn’t just physical fitness that gets you to the top.

My advice is to prepare as much as you can within the possibilities of your lifestyle and don’t let worry or stress enter that regime! You don’t need a hardcore training schedule and for most people some lifestyle changes such as escaping to the countryside, beach or hills at the weekend or even walking to work will be a great step in the right direction. You really don’t need to be a super fit, highly tuned athlete but you should work on stamina, general well being and be comfortable with living outdoors for prolonged periods of time.

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Rather than asking how fit do I need to be to climb Kilimanjaro it would be better to ask ‘How should I prepare for climbing Kili?’ That’s a better and more holistic approach to summiting the roof of Africa. You can’t train for altitude, well not on UK or Irish hills, but you can work on all other aspects of the climb. Read up and learn about the route, weather and living conditions on (for example) the Machame Route, then how you can best prepare in terms of health and altitude on Kilimanjaro, also look at kit and the right gear for the climb: Kilimanjaro kit list and of course consider your training for Kilimanjaro!

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Remember climbing Kilimanjaro is a holiday, an adventure and not a forced march! The secret of climbing Mt Kilimanjaro is to go slow, enjoy the scenery, drink well, eat well and sleep well – it’s better than any exercise or diet book! A regular, consistent and slow pace will ensure proper acclimatisation and in terms of training; well it should include regular hill walking with a small pack of around 10 kgs, or regular visits to the gym for the final two months before departure. Work on strengthening calf and thigh muscles and exercise your cardio-vascular stamina on a step machine or cross trainer. If you do all of the above you’ll be well prepared mentally and physically for a climb of Kilimanjaro.

School Expedition now run in Tanzania as well as Kenya

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Adventure Alternative have extended their popular ‘Africamp’ School Expedition to Kenya into Tanzania after a very successful trip in the summer of 2014, which saw a team of 22 students and 3 teachers from Writhlington School in Radstock join our team in Tanzania for a camp with kids from Ng’aroni Primary School on the lower slopes of Kilimanjaro.

Africampers & children work together to build class

Aside from the kids camp the team also helped with our first Moving Mountains project in Tanzania, to build a classroom on the site of Ng’aroni Primary School before climbing the stunning Mt Meru (4565m) and finishing the expedition with an overland safari to experience more of East Africa’s diverse culture and wildlife.

Approaching summit of Mt Meru
You can keep up to date with all the latest news from our school expeditions in East Africa at the Adventure Alternative and Moving Mountains Facebook pages

What on earth is a Huayna Potosi or a Pequeno Alpamayo?

The mountains of Huayna Potosi and Pequeno Alpamayo are both within 40km of La Paz in the Condoriri Group of the La Coordillera Blanca part of the Bolivan Andes of Latin America, a bit of a mouthful! If fact on a clear day you can see both peaks from the edge of the city. Confusingly, Bolivia has two capital cities, the official one being Sucre but the second is La Paz. The government sits in La Paz but the ‘seat of justice’ is in Sucre (one for the pub quiz?). At 3200-4100m, La Paz is at the limit of the human body is prepared to accept as a permanent home. Arriving here on a plane from sea level therefore needs to be followed up with some proper relaxation to let your body catch up with its acclimitisation. As luck would have it, lake Titicaca is nearby to offer up some relaxed days ahead of the climbs.

Huayna Potosi and Pequeno Alpamayo are shapely pyramids in form, with ‘proper’ cartoon-book summits at the culmination of nicely Matterhorn-esque ridges, they are very photogenic.

Pequeno Alpamayo_Bolivia_Summit ridgeThese features make the peaks look like they should be the preserve of craggy-faced, square-jawed alpinists with triangular upper bodies throwing out one-arm pullups at will. Thankfully for the rest of us, there are actually some relatively straightforward ridge-routes graded at around Alpine grade AD.

That isn’t to say that this is an easy climb that anyone can do though. Anyone considering it does need to have previous experience of altitude, a head for heights, composure, experience with crampons, ice axes and basic rope-work. This will not only help to ensure your safety, but also your enjoyment and how much you are able to take in and get the most from the climb.

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Along with climbing in the Himalayas, an expedition to the Andes has to rate as one of the great adventures that all aspiring mountaineers have on their bucket list. So in answer to the question; ‘What on earth is a Huayna Potosi or a Pequeno Alpamayo?’ – it is a great opportunity for the aspiring mountaineer to come out to Bolivia and climb not one but two beautiful ‘Andes’!

Take a look at the Adventure Alternative website for more info.

Trekking and Big Society in Morocco

The following is re-produced from an article in the Peterlee Star on September 25th 2013. The author, David Taylor-Gooby, and his brother Peter, joined Adventure Alternative for a summer trek in the Moroccan High Atlas, including an ascent to its highest point, Jebel Toubkal.

As you may know from the Star I have been in Morocco most of last week, so this article is an attempt to make some observations about health as a result of the expedition.  I am not sure about the effects on my health, but I did manage to climb Mount Toubkal, and I want to thank all those who sponsored me.

 When I go on an expedition like this, I feel like the lines of Keats recently popularised by the BBC, “Much have I travelled in the realms of gold…… silent upon a peak in Darien”.  But when I come back down to earth, several points relating to health stand out when visiting a country less well developed than our own.

Average life expectancy in Morocco is 72, according to the World Health Organisation.  That compares with 80 for the UK and 79 for America.  It is well ahead of central and southern Africa.  You notice that public health in terms of plumbing, toilets and clean water is much worse than in this country. You see fresh meat being carried through the streets on a warm day. But on the other hand you notice that most Moroccans, including the elderly, are thinner than we are.  They eat far less processed food.  Fresh products are sold in markets, and fresh bread is baked every day. And, of course, most of them do not drink alcohol.

So should we sit back on our laurels and think that the answer for Morocco’s health to improve is to become like us?  I saw another piece of literature about health last week, Professor Lieberman’s book “The Story of the human Body, Evolution, Health and Disease” in which he argues that our modern lifestyles and food consumption are becoming more likely to cause cancer. He argues  that the body will naturally put on excess weight if it can so that it has a reserve for leaner times.  Unfortunately we never encounter those leaner times nowadays , so the fat stays with us.  The answer as we all know, is a healthier diet and more exercise. So we may not stay ahead of the game in terms of life expectancy for ever.

Progress is not one-sided.  We can teach countries like Morocco much about hygiene and preventing disease, but in terms of lifestyles we could learn from them. If we ate more locally produced fresh food we would probably be healthier.

Incidentally, if you want to improve your own health, I would recommend a trekking holiday.  There are all sorts of varieties of expeditions, and it is a unique experience.  Look at organisations like “Adventure Alternative” which I can certainly recommend.

David Taylor-Gooby is a Lay Member of the Durham Dales, Easington and Sedgefield Commissioning Group. He writes in a personal capacity.

David and Peter have between them published a number of books dealing with social policy. You can see some of them on Amazon.

Race me to the Pole – the last push

Ahead of relaying the final instalment on Gavin’s trip, we want to thank all supporters of Gavin and Moving Mountains Trust throughout this expedition on behalf of Gavin himself and all of the Moving Mountains staff and beneficiaries. 100% of the donations will go towards projects in Kenya, Nepal and Borneo so make sure you follow Moving Mountains in the near future to see the fantastic projects that these funds will help support like the Rescue Centre in Embu, seen below.

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The last re-supply checkpoint was at Cator Harbour on Sherard Osborn Island, right at the Northern Tip of Bathurst Island and at the 310km mark of the journey. Gavin and the team made it here on the 21st April. The re-supply plane picked up one of the guides, Steve, who unfortunately suffered from frostbitten fingers. As a precaution he was flown back to Resolute to have it checked out and we since hear he is doing fine.

The re-supply plane brought extra food and fresh sat-phone batteries. These phones have been one of the only links between Gavin and the outside world, allowing us to exchange brief conversations, and relay information by text. In addition, the Yellow Brick GPS tracker unit has allowed us view his position at hourly intervals on the interactive map and also extract accurate Lat/Long coordinates. In temperatures often reaching -40 degrees Celsius there’s only place for the hardiest electronics, meaning Gavin was not able to relay digital files, videos or photos since leaving Resolute Bay.

From Gav_2013_04_xx Moody Skies Above (2)After Sherard Osborn Island, Gavin and the team continued North West over relatively smooth sea ice that had ‘freshly’ frozen this year. This offered a little respite from skiing over older, broken and re-frozen ice rubble and also the areas where they were forced onto the land at Airstrip Point and Cape lady Franklin; testing work!

During the penultimate week of the expedition, with temperatures still extremely low, a lot of Gavin’s insulating down gear had become wet through condensation from sweating and cooking and then frozen solid. The team had therefore been hoping for slightly higher temperatures and some direct sunlight to afford the opportunity to try and melt and dry out some of their essential kit. Soon after, we received news that conditions had improved dramatically. However, a new concern was raised; the team feared that they might not make it to the Pole in time for their pick-up. After losing ground to the Arctic snow storm the week before, it was looking like the team would have to spend 10-12 hours skiing every day for a week, that’s said to be akin to doing a marathon every day of the week!

On the night of the 27th of April the team had a near miss with a polar bear. The team

polar bear in snow stormhad managed to stay way out of reach of these Arctic giants right through the ususal danger zone close to ‘Polar Bear Pass’ on Bathurst Island, but just days from the pole, the team had a 1am polar bear visit. The curious bear sniffed around, leaving 8 inch wide paw prints circling the tents. Luckily, the creature didn’t commit any breaking and entering, but rather sent one of the team into a mild panic; the dilemma of being the only member of the crew to be awake and hearing the deep breathing of a polar bear...

On May the 29th, at around 03:30 GMT (9:30pm local time) Gavin and the rest of the team made it to the North Pole after a mammoth 35km push over the course of more than 13 hours. Not long after arriving at the pole last night and setting up their camp, a tired and emotional Gavin, called in to leave the message they had been looking forward to uttering for weeks, “We are at the Pole”. To listen to the final audio message, plus earlier stories from the expedition, visit Flickr .

The race may have finished, but the team still have to ski approximately 28km today (30th April) to get to the airstrip at Isachsen. The strip is on the land, considered much safer than landing on the sea ice, although it will of course be covered in snow. There is only one aircraft available to pick the team up tomorrow, meaning that the plane will have to do two trips to pick up all of the team and their kit. They will try and get as many people on the first plane as possible but will have to leave a few for the second trip, along with as much gear as they can. They may have to leave behind gear in the abandoned weather station buildings but this may well be of use to people in the future if they do.

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According to the Environment Canada Climate Severity Index, Isachsen and the surrounding area has the worst weather in Canada with a CSI severity value of 99 out of a possible 100. Trees and shrubs cannot survive this far north, restraining the wildlife to polar bears, Arctic Foxes, seals, muskoxen and a variety of migratory birds. The abandoned weather station will therefore prove to be a welcome shelter, though they will no doubt be praying that it is a very temporary one.

A huge thank you to everyone who has already joined the Donation Team by donating to the Moving Mountains Trust via the Race Me To The Pole campaign. So far we have raised a fantastic £14,278, 40, putting us at the 354km mark.

It is not too late to join the team or even re-affirm your membership with any donation, large or small.

To donate, visit the Race me to the Pole MyDonate page.

Or, to donate via text

send…. POLE13 £5

to…. 70070

On behalf of everyone who will benefit from the work of Moving Mountains, around the globe, we would like to say a huge THANK YOU for donating and supporting us so far.

An Unseasonably Cold Spring

As you may have heard, Adventure Alternative founder and Director, Gavin Bate, is currently ski-ing 550km to the magnetic North Pole to raise money for Moving Mountains Trust (@MMTrust). Thanks to unseasonably good weather and high pressure over the Arctic, Gavin is ahead of schedule at an impressive 88km after just four days of ski-ing.

HeaderWith indications that the spell of good weather may be changing, Gavin’s pace may well reduce significantly in the coming days and weeks. Along with the news of low pressure returning to the Arctic comes news of returning high pressure to Europe, about time!

Many parts of the Northern Hemisphere saw near record-breaking cool temperatures this Spring. The United Kingdom experienced its 4th coldest March since 1962.

280711721.thumbWhy? Scientists have been observing the Arctic Oscillation (AO) – a measure of pressure – and have found some interesting results. Pressure is always in flux as air masses of different temperatures/pressures move around the globe. When the AO index is in its ‘positive’ phase, air pressure over the Arctic is low, pressure over the mid-latitudes is high, and prevailing winds confine extremely cold air to the Arctic. But when the AO is in its ‘negative’ phase, the pressure gradient weakens. The pressure over the Arctic is not as low and pressure at mid-latitudes is not as high, seeing Arctic air flow to the south and warm air to move north.

In late March, the AO dropped as low as -5.6, one of the five lowest values ever recorded by meteorologists. It’s hard to link these changes to one phenomenon, but many scientists believe that it might be linked to the loss of Arctic sea ice. This happens naturally in Spring as temperatures warm, but the loss has been increasing dramatically year upon year.

How ironic that global warming may actually lead to a European climate similar to that of Canada and Siberia. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves; good weather is on the way! Temperatures are set to reach up to 20°C by Sunday. Rejoice!

100413 TwitterLet’s hope that the low pressure heading to the Arctic doesn’t cause too many disruptions on the Race to the Pole. To follow Gavin’s progress, visit the Race me to the Pole website where his location is updated on a map every 4 hours.

Thanks to those of you who have already donated. You are now in the ‘Donation Team’ and have made 49.5km of progress! Thanks!