Can there be gender equality in the Kenya tourism industry? Eva from AA Kenya believes so.

My names are Evelyn Muronji Walluckano and I’ve worked in the Kenya tourism industry for nine years after I pursued a diploma in food production and a second in tour guiding and administration.

When I enrolled in college the ratio of men to women was 4:1 however the number of women doing tour guiding courses was almost zero. Even today, years later, there are still less than 10 women who actively work as tour guides in Kenya. The reason? Well there is an old perception that tour guiding is a role for men. Many women, even after going through their years in college, end up working in hotels doing bookings for safaris, cleaning rooms, receptionist duties and secretarial roles; they don’t pursue what they studied and instead believe that the afore-mentioned roles are the female jobs in the tourism industry.

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Despite many years of academic analysis and practical feminist activity, despite prestigious international resolutions and declarations of intent, despite increased awareness of women’s issues in the discourses of governmental and non-governmental organizations alike, progress towards gender equality is still painfully slow. Although advances are being made on particular fronts there is still a long way to go.

Looking at the tourist industry in Kenya women are treated as second class to their male counterparts, despite many women having apt skills, knowledge and qualifications and quite often more so than their male counterparts, they are prejudiced and frustrated in terms of remuneration and career growth; organizations would rather hand leadership roles to male employees rather than women. As a result there is no degree or recognition of merit when awarding these posts. Many women are left frustrated and forced to stay in a job only for the meager pay, not because they want to chart a future for career growth within the organization or industry. The contempt shown to women stems from the outdated belief that a woman’s place is in the kitchen and looking after the family whilst the man is the king and has the ultimate say in all aspects of family life.

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Initially I worked for an organization which did not value my education, my skills nor my positive input in terms of business development ideas and plans. My career growth stagnated and I was never nominated for any skills development workshops or courses. My male counterparts were however given every opportunity to better their skills and all leadership roles given to them. Remuneration was also gender biased and all my male counterparts earned more than me. All posts from directors to managers to tour guides were males as the organization believed that men are better, which to me sounded very ridiculous to say the least! I was frustrated by my supervisors and managers who saw me as a threat. I can confidently say that despite this I worked hard and out performed all of my male colleagues; but the organization neither commended nor nominated me for any posts. Frustration grew, but God answered my prayer in the form of a new job at Adventure Alternative.

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At Adventure Alternative I found a different work ethic, something unique and most definitely not the norm in Kenya! It was indeed alternative, it was friendly and the emphasis was on team-work and equality. It was more like a family, everyone was regarded as an individual and not by sex and my career growth is headed on an upward course. My Director Mr. Gavin Bate holds constant briefings and mentors us intensively. He gives each and every one of us an equal shot at becoming their best, he goes an extra mile to follow-up on everyone’s personal development and suggests ways in which we can develop our skills further. Here in this organization we have all come to regard each other as family. We feel that we matter and we feel we grow and develop.

Ever since I joined Adventure Alternative I have worked with men in the field of tour guiding but unlike the past I have experienced equality. If we have the willingness and opportunity to learn from others on an equal basis and mutual respect and if we believe in ourselves, then I believe women can have a bright future in this industry and the sky is the limit.

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http://www.adventurealternative.com/news_stories

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